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Cheracol

SKU: ULB1108 $0.75 USD



Historic Overview

Cheracol, also known as Guaifenesin, is an expectorant that loosens phlegm and increases the lubrication of the lungs allowing you to cough and remove the chest congestion. It is not unusual to see it paired with Codeine, a narcotic, which is the case with this preparation. While the Cheracol makes you expel the mucus, the Codeine acts as a pain reliever and keeps you from coughing excessively. It is commonly used to treat cough and nasal congestion associated with the common cold, allergies and infections.

This pharmacy label is from McAdams & Morford, wholesale druggist, from Lexington, Kentucky and measures 2.6” Wide x 1.35” High. The label dates back to 1910 and is in excellent condition with good graphics. It would be great to pair it with our Diluted Hydrochloric Acid label from the same druggist.


WE GUARANTEE ALL LABELS TO BE AUTHENTIC AND AS DESCRIBED!



Customers Also Viewed

Green Soap, Southwood Drugs, New Jersey
$1.05
This is a very unique label for the drug trade and the only one like it I have come across. The label is printed in tan, red, and gold. The gold is used for the Southwood Drugs logo. This is very fancy for a drug label from the 1960s. The label measures 2.75" Wide x 1.5" Tall and is for Comp. Tinct. of Green Soap, N.F. which is used as a local cleaner for minor skin irritations. It is actually more commonly used as a tattooist's soap. Piercers and tattoo artists use it to prep skin, remove soil, blood, and ink, and as a soak for surgical instruments. In the late 1940s, Philip Grolnick and his younger brother, Abe, opened Grolnick Drugs at Broad and Susquehanna Streets in North Philadelphia. In 1958, they moved their business to Woodbury Heights and operated Southwood Drugs until 1977 when it was sold. Mr. Grolnick continued to work there until he retired at 87. Philip died at the age of 100. The Grolnick brothers had kept "profile cards" on their customers and noted when a patient had a bad reaction to a drug, years before New Jersey began requiring pharmacists to do so. They mixed the drugs themselves and stressed personal service, which enabled them to cultivate a loyal clientele in the face of rising competition from drug chains and discount houses. Their store also offered a soda fountain and an assortment of gift items. Their biggest business day each year was Dec. 24, when the store accommodated a surge of last-minute Christmas shoppers. A staff of about 12 gift-wrapped even the smallest present at no charge. When the employees went home at 6 p.m. to spend Christmas Eve with their families, the Grolnick brothers, who were Jewish, recruited their relatives in Philadelphia to handle the final waves of customers until the store finally closed at 11 p.m. WE GUARANTEE OUR LABELS TO BE AUTHENTIC AND AS DESCRIBED!
Schmidt Drugs Potassium Permanganate Poison Label
$1.05
This label is from Schmidt Drugs Store in Springfield, Ohio, and measures 2.62” Wide x 2” High. Adam Schmidt immigrated to the United States form Hessen-Darmstadt, Germany in 1842 as a young boy of 19. He moved west and at 29 joined the business of C. A. Smith & Company in Springfield, Ohio. In 1885 Adam bought out the interests of his partners and continued the business under the name of Schmidt’s Drug Store. His son Albert came into the business around 1920. I don’t know when they closed, but traced the store being opened in the late 1940s. The store remained throughout the years in the same location it started, 63 West Main Street, Springfield, Ohio. I have found a great photo of Adam Schmidt behind the counter. You will notice the Schmidt Drug Store logo is very ornate with clouds behind the name, eagle with wings spread, and the address in a banner. You don’t see many labels with this amount of detail. In the mid 1800s, a London chemist named Henry Bollmann Condy came up with a solution that had good disinfectant properties. After some work he figured out how to make it stable and dried it to produce potassium permanganate powder. This powder was called Condy’s crystals or Condy’s powder and when dissolved in water to make a purple solution. Potassium permanganate was easy to make so Condy was constantly trying to stop other people from making it and selling it. Early photographers used it in flash powder and it was used in disinfectants and in deodorizers. Dilute solutions are used as a treatment for canker sores and mild fungal infections. It can be found at pool supply stores and removes the rotten egg smell from well water. It is used to treat some parasitic diseases of fish and it is typically included in survival kits as a fire starter and water sterilizer. Unfortunately, it can quickly stain virtually any organic material such as skin, paper, and clothing. If you mix it with, or it comes in contact with, sulfuric acid or simple alcohols it will cause a violent combustion reaction. WE GUARANTEE ALL LABELS TO BE AUTHENTIC AND AS DESCRIBED!


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